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Latest Research

Service Design to Balance Waiting Time and Infection Risk: An Application for Elections During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors
Susana Mondschein, Marcelo Olivares, Fernando Ordóñez, Daniel Schwartz, Andres Weintraub, Ignacio Torres-Ulloa, Cristian Aguayo, and Gianpiero Canessa
Date
Format
Journal Article
Journal
Management Science
1 / 3

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused great disruption to the service sector, and it has, in turn, adapted by implementing measures that reduce physical contact among employees and users; examples include home-office work and the setting of occupancy restrictions at indoor locations. The design of services in the context of a pandemic requires balancing between two objectives: (i) special measures must be implemented to maintain physical separation among people to reduce the risk of infection, and (ii) these sanitary measures also reduce process capacity, thereby increasing the waiting times of users. We study this problem in the context of election processes, in which balancing waiting time with public safety is of first order relevance to ensuring voter turnout, using as a real-world application the Chilean 2020 national referendum. Analyzing this problem requires a multidisciplinary approach that consists of integrating randomized experiments to measure how voters weigh infection risk relative to waiting time and stochastic modeling/discrete event simulation to prescribe recommendations for the service design—specifically setting capacity limits to trade off between overcrowding and process efficiency. Overall, our results shows that infection risk is an important factor affecting voter turnout during a pandemic and that capacity limits can be a useful design tool to balance these risks with other service quality measures. Some of these findings were considered in the guidelines that Servel provided to manage capacity and voter arrival patterns at voting centers.

The Information Mechanism in Corporate Citizenship: Evidence from COVID-19

Authors
Lisa Liu, and Shirley Lu
Date
2 / 3

We explore firms' ability to collect, verify, and use information as a mechanism that facilitates the role of companies as powerful corporate citizens who can mitigate societal problems. Specifically, we study whether US firms' business networks with China and Italy are information networks and whether firms use relevant information to mitigate the negative impacts of COVID-19. We first show descriptive evidence that firms with these networks have relevant information about COVID-19. We then document higher stay-at-home ratios in areas with more information-exposure companies before local city governments impose measures, suggesting that firms act on relevant information to safeguard employee health. We find the effects are more pronounced when industries are teleworkable, when regulators have information constraints, and when the information is verifiable or trustworthy. Finally, we show a lower growth in COVID-19 in areas with higher stay-at-home ratios, suggesting a positive impact of firms’ corporate citizenship

Evidence That Investors Penalize Female Founders for Lack of Industry Fit

Authors
Damon Phillips, Dana Kanze, Mark Conley, Tyler Okimoto, and Jennifer Merluzzi
Date
3 / 3

Are female founding CEOs penalized when raising funds for their ventures based on industry served? Across an observational study conducted on ventures seeking funding (N = 392) and an experimental study conducted on investors allocating venture funding (N = 130), we find evidence for a “lack of fit” effect: Female-led ventures catering to male-dominated industries receive significantly less funding at significantly lower valuations than female-led ventures catering to female-dominated industries. In contrast, male-led ventures attain similar funding and valuation outcomes regardless of the gender dominance of the industries to which they cater. We confirm that this is because investors perceive lower degrees of fit between founding CEO and venture for female-led ventures catering to male- as opposed to female-dominated industries (with no perceived fit differences for male-led ventures across industries). Degree of investor sophistication emerges as a potential attenuating factor, appearing to help reduce gender bias from perceived lack of fit.

Latest Webinars & Presentations

Type
Webinar
Date
Economics & Policy

Why Value Investing is Making a Comeback

Professor Tano Santos, the Faculty Director of Value Investing and Advanced Value Investing programs at Columbia Business School, outlines the reasons why value investing is returning to a period of ascendancy.

Type
Webinar
Date
Economics & Policy

What Will Drive the Global Markets in 2023?

Columbia Business School Professor Abby Joseph Cohen recently joined former Dean Glenn Hubbard to discuss the forces that could shape the economy and markets in the year ahead.

Type
Webinar
Date
Data & Business Analytics

How Can Leaders Use Data to Make Better Decisions?

Columbia Business School Professors Oded Netzer, Christopher Frank and Paul Magnone discuss their new book, Decisions Over Decimals, which offers a roadmap for effective decision-making when using data.

Type
Webinar
Date
Economics & Policy, Entrepreneurship & Innovation

5 Questions About Value Investing and Finance

Professor Tano Santos, the Faculty Director of Value Investing and Advanced Value Investing programs at Columbia Business School, discusses the school’s approach to teaching value investing and finance.

Type
Webinar
Date
Data & Business Analytics

Driving Business Efficiencies at Uber Freight

Find out how Columbia Business School graduate Bar Ifrach, PhD ’12, now senior director of applied science and head of marketplace at Uber Freight, uses data to solve high-impact business problems.

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